Advertisement
Please update your Flash Player to view content.

Please update your Flash Player to view content.

Convenors:

Melissa Baralt, Florida International University, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Roger Gilabert, University of Barcelona, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Marije Michel, Lancaster University, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Andrea Révész, University College London, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The goal of this ReN is to promote consistency in the way in which task-based research operationalizes independent and dependent variables.

Research on how task-related factors affects language use and language learning has been a productive strand in instructed second language acquisition (SLA) research in recent years. However, while there have been considerable advances in our understanding of task variables, the field still has a scattered research agenda. Extant research involves diverse ways of operationalizing task-related factors and encompasses variables such as task type, task complexity, task sequencing, and planning time. Dependent measures of task performance and second language learning have also varied greatly. With a paucity of replication studies, a proliferation of task variables, and performance measures, it is almost impossible to compare and evaluate the existing work and to come to a synthesized understanding of how task factors relate to second language use and SLA.

The activities planned in conjunction with this ReN aim to bring to light these issues and foster collaboration in strengthening what we know about the way in which task factors, language production, and language learning are linked.

Our first planned activity is a colloquium at the upcoming Task-Based Language Teaching conference in Leuven, organized by Drs. John Norris (Georgetown University) and Mike Long (University of Maryland). The topic addresses the following:

Narrative reviews and a recent research synthesis have found results from over 250 studies of task complexity to date hard to interpret because researchers employ so many different definitions of terms, research designs, variables, and measures. As in other disciplines, a collaborative research network (CRN) could improve the quality and yield of future research on this and other problems in SLA, applied linguistics, and TBLT. Voluntary membership in a network of established researchers could speed up progress through pooling ideas, facilities, expertise, research participants, data and funding sources, by facilitating replication studies, and generally making the international research effort cumulative.

For more information on this colloquium as well as details of the papers to be presented, please visit http://www.tblt.org/conferences/2015/colloquia/

Our ReN will meet at the EuroSLA 2016 and AILA 2017 conferences. These meetings (and planned research) are for the purpose of developing a common research agenda for task-based scholarship.

At present, the ReN’s members are:

From Belgium:

Bram Bulté, Free University Brussels

Koen van Gorp, University of Leuven

Alex Housen, Free University Brussels

Elke Peters, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven

 

From Italy:

Gabriele Pallotti, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia

 

From Japan:

Peter Robinson, Aoyama Gakuin University

Daniel O. Jackson, Kanda University of International Studies

 

From The Netherlands:

Marrit van de Guchte, University of Amsterdam

Nel de Jong, Free University of Amsterdam

Ineke Vedder, University of Amsterdam

 

From New Zealand:

Rosemary Erlam, University of Auckland

 

From Spain:

Roger Gilabert Guerrero, University of Barcelona

Mayya Levkina, University of Barcelona

Aleksandra Malicka, University of Barcelona

Lena Vasylets, University of Barcelona

 

From the United Kingdom:

Jookyoung Jung, University College London

Judit Kormos, Lancaster University

Nektaria Kourtali, University College London

Marije Michel, Lancaster University

Jenefer Philp, Lancaster University

Andrea Révész, University College London

Parvaneh Tavakoli, University of Reading

Clare Wright, University of Reading

 

From the United States of America:

Melissa Baralt, Florida International University

Minyoung Cho, University of Hawai`i, Manoa

Marta Gonzalez Lloret, University of Hawai`i

Laura Gurzynski-Weiss, Indiana University

Jake Guyton, Florida International University

YouJin Kim, Georgia State University

Shawn Loewen, Michigan State University

Michael H Long, University of Maryland

José Morcillo Gómez, Florida International University

John Norris, Georgetown University

Lourdes Ortega, Georgetown University

Rebecca Sachs, Virginia International University

AILA is pleased to announce the establishment of the following Research Networks (ReNs) for the 2014-2017 cycle.

If you would like more information about a specific ReN, please contact the convenor.


Academic Publishing and Presenting in a Global Context

Convenors:

Mary Jane Curry (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Theresa Lillis (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Academic Writing in English as a Foreign Language

Convenor:

Lidia Taillefer (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Developing and Supporting Adaptations to Learning Environments for Adolescents from Migrant Backgrounds in Mainstream (Canadian/Irish/Danish/Australian) Classrooms 

Convenor:

Shelley K. Taylor (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Communication in Specialized Domains

Convenor:

Inmaculada Álvarez de Mon y Rego (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Complexity and Second Language Learning

Convenor:

Folkert Kuiken (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Ineke Vedder (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Content and Language Integrated Learning and Immersion Classrooms

Convenor:

Rick de Graaff (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Corpus Linguistics and Technology

Convenor:

Maocheng Liang (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Digital Gaming

Convenors:

Hayo Reinders (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Alice Chik (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Early Language Learning

Convenor:

Janet Enever (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


English as a Lingua Franca

Convenors:

Alessia Cogo (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Marie­Luise Pitzl (marie­This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Folk Linguistics

Convenors:

Antje Wilton (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Martin Stegu (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


History of Language Learning and Teaching

Convenors:

Richard Smith (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Nicola McLelland (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Friederike Klippel (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Giovanni Iamartino (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Website: www.hollt.net


Instructor and Interlocutor Individual Differences in Cognition and Second Language Acquisition

Convenor:

Laura Gurzynski­Weiss (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Intercultural Mediation in Language and Culture teaching and Learning

Convenors:

Geneviève Zarate (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Anthony J. Liddicoat (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Language Policy

Convenor:

Terrence Wiley (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

LPReN List Manager: Shereen Bhalla (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Learner Autonomy

Convenor:

Alice Chik (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Kerstin Dofs (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Moira Hobbs (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Media Linguistics

Convenor:

Daniel Perrin (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Geert Jacobs (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Migrants in Working Life: Language, Identities and Positions

Convenors:

Minna Suni (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Julie Kerekes (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Jo Angouri (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Multilingualism

Convenors:

Jasone Cenoz (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Jean­Marc Dewaele (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Native­speakerism across Languages and Contexts

Convenor:

Stephanie Houghton (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Social and Affective Factors in Home Language Maintenance

Convenors:

Andrea Schalley (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Susana Eisenchlas (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Sociocultural Theory, Usage Based Linguistics, and Emergentism

Convenor:

Jean­Paul Narcy­Combes (jean­paul.narcy­This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Study Abroad and Language Learning

Convenors:

Carmen Pérez­Vidal (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Martin Howard (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Tasks and Second Language Acquisition

Convenors:

Melissa Baralt (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Roger Gilabert (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Marije Michel (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Andrea Révész (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Teacher Education and Professional Development

Convenor:

Zhou Yan (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


 

Convenors

Mary Jane Curry, University of Rochester, US mThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Theresa Lillis, The Open University, UK This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Network focus

Scholars around the world are coming under increasing pressure not only to publish, but often to publish in English. While many multilingual scholars are committed to continuing to present and publish in local, national and regional languages, publishing in English frequently carries not only prestige but material rewards such as salary and promotion. However, publishing in English requires the dedication of extra resources in terms of time, effort, and money, thus often becoming both an obstacle to scholars’ intellectual and political interests and to opportunities for multidirectional transnational scholarly exchange.

Growing research area

In the past 15 years a growing body of research has documented the pressures facing multilingual scholars as they present and publish their work in English as well as their opinions about these changes in working conditions and linguistic practices (e.g., Burgess & Martin 2008; Canagarajah, 1996, 2002; Martin, 2008; Curry & Lillis, 2004, 2010a; Englander, 2006, 2011; Flowerdew, 2000, 2008; Fortanet, 2002, 2008; Hanauer & Englander, 2011; Hyland & Salager-Meyer, 2008; Lillis & Curry, 2006a, 2006b, 2010, 2013; Salager-Meyer, 2008;  Uzuner, 2008). Pressures for postgraduate students to publish early and often in English have also been investigated (Flowerdew & Li, 2007). Furthermore, the growing number of English-medium journals published outside of dominant Anglophone contexts has been documented and studied (Lillis, 2012). Alongside research on English as a global language more generally, there is a need for continued research on the impact of English on scholarly publishing and presenting. There is also a need for research on scholars publishing in local, national, regional and other languages and their/our interests and challenges in doing so in the face of the pressures to publish in English.

The goals of the Academic Publishing in a Global Context Research Network

The Academic Publishing in a Global Context Research Network involves researchers from a range of geopolitical and geolinguistic locations interested in exploring the many facets of this phenomenon as well as possible responses, both in research and practical terms, including:

  • Disseminating information about research on scholarly publishing and presenting,  governmental and institutional evaluation criteria and practical activities related to publishing and presenting.
  • Creating an online space for sharing resources and research reports. We have set up an open Google Group at https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/aila-pub-ren 
  • Informing scholarly associations, publishers, and other audiences about research findings of practical use to scholars in publishing and presenting research.
  • Creating strategies for working with journal editors and reviewers, scientists/scholars, authors’ editors, and policymakers in terms of the challenges  presented, including access to resources available to multilingual scholars for publishing and presenting in English
  • Holding sessions at international conferences including a symposium at AILA 2014 on Research on Academic Publishing and Its Applications

 

References and sample bibliography

Burgess, S. & Martin, P.M. (Eds.) (2008). English as an additional language in research publication and communication. New York: Peter Lang.

Canagarajah, A.S.  (2002). A geopolitics of academic writing, Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press.

Canagarajah, A. S. (1996) ‘Nondiscursive requirements in academic publishing, material resources of periphery scholars, and the politics of knowledge production’, WrittenCommunication, 13(4): 435–472.

Cargill, M., & O'Connor, P. (2011). Identifying and addressing challenges to international publication success for EFL science researchers: Implementing an integrated training package in China. In R. Tang (Ed.), Academic writing in a second or foreign language: Issues and challenges facing ESL/EFL academic writers in higher education contexts. Continuum.

Cargill, M., & O'Connor, P. (2010). Structuring interdisciplinary collaboration to develop research students’ skills for publishing research internationally: Lessons from implementation. In M. Davies, M. Devlin & M. Tight (Eds.), Interdisciplinary higher education: Perspectives and practicalities. International Perspectives on higher education research Volume 5 (pp. 279-292). Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.

Curry, M.J. & Lillis, T. (in preparation)Getting published in a multilingual world: critical choices, practical strategies. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.

Curry, M.J. & Lillis, T. (2010a). Academic research networks: Accessing resources for English-medium publishing. English for Specific Purposes, 29(4), 281-295.

Curry, M.J. & Lillis, T. (2010b). Making academic publishing practices visible: Designing research-based heuristics to support English-medium text production. In N. Harwood (Ed.), Language teaching materials: Theory and practice (pp. 322-345). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Curry, M.J. and Lillis, T. (Forthcoming 2013) (eds) Special Issue Language Policy, Participating in Academic Publishing: Consequences of Linguistic Policies and Practices.

Curry, M.J. & Lillis, T. (2004). Multilingual scholars and the imperative to publish in English: Negotiating interests, demands, and rewards. TESOL Quarterly, 38(4), 663-688.

Englander, K. (2011). The globalized world of English scientific publishing: An analytical  that situates a multilingual scholar. In G. López-Bonilla & K, Englander (Eds.). Discourses and identities in contexts of educational change: Contributions from the United States and Mexico (pp. 211-230). New York: Peter Lang Publishers.

Englander, K. (2006). Revision of scientific manuscripts by nonnative-English-speaking scientists in response to journal editors’ language critiques. Journal of Applied Linguistics, 3 129-161.

Flowerdew, J. (2008). The non-Anglophone scholar at the periphery of scientific communication. AILA Review, 20, 14-27.

Flowerdew, J. (2000). Discourse community, legitimate peripheral participation, and the nonnative-English-speaking scholar. TESOL Quarterly, 34(1), 127-150.

Flowerdew, J. & Li, Y.Y. (2007). Language re-use among Chinese apprentice scientists writing for publication. Applied Linguistics, 28(3), 440-65.

Fortanet, I. (2008). Evaluative language in peer review referee reports.  Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 7(1), 27-37.

Fortanet, I. (coord.). (2002).Cómo escribir un artículo de investigación en inglés. Madrid: Alianza editorial.

Hanauer, D. I. & Englander, K. (2011). Quantifying the burden of writing research articles in a second language: Data from Mexican scientists. Written Communication, 28(4).

Huang, J. C.  (2010). Publishing and learning writing for publication in English: perspectives of NNE (non-native English speakers) PhD students in science.  Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 9, 33-44.

Hyland, K. & Salager-Meyer, F. (2008). Scientific writing. Annual Review of Information Science and Technology, 297-339

Lillis, T. (2012) Economies of signs in writing for academic publication: The case of English medium “national” journals. Journal of Advanced Composition. 32.(3-4) : 695–722.

Lillis, T., Magyar, A. and Robinson-Pant, A. (2010). An international journal’s attempts to address inequalities in academic publishing: developing awriting for publication programme. Compare:  A Journal of Comparative and International Education, 40(6), 781-800.

Lillis, T. & Curry, M. J. (2010).  Academic writing in a global context: The politics and practices of publishing in English. London: Routledge.

Lillis, T. & Curry, M.J. (2006a). Professional academic writing by multilingual scholars: Interactions with literacy brokers in the production of English-medium texts. Written Communication, 23(1), 3-35.

Lillis, T. & Curry, M.J. (2006b). Reframing notions of competence in scholarly writing: From individual to networked activity. Revista Canaria de Estudios Ingleses, 53, 63-78.

Marušic, M., Markulin, H., Lukic, I. K., Marušic, A. (2006) Academic advancement of authors receiving tutoring from a medical journal. Teaching and Learning in Medicine, 18(2). pp. 126-129.

Pérez-Llantada,  C., Plo, R., & Ferguson, G. (2011). “You don’t say what you know, only what you can”: The perception and practices of senior Spanish academics regarding research dissemination in English. English for Specific Purposes, 30, 18–30.

Salager-Meyer, F. (2008). Scientific publishing in developing countries: Challenges for the future. Journal of English for Academic Purposes,7,121-132.

Salager-Meyer, F. (2009). Academic equality and cooperative justice, TESOL Quarterly, 43(4), 703-709.

Swales, J. (2004) Research Genres, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Swales, J. M. &  Leeder, C.  (2012).  A reception study of the articles published in English for Specific Purposes from 1990-1999. English for Specific Purposes, 31, 137-146.

Tang, R. (Ed). (2012) Academic writing in a second or foreign language: Issues and challenges facing ESL/EFL academic writers in higher education contexts. London: Continuum.

Tardy, C. (2004).The role of English in scientific communication: lingua franca or Tyrannosaurus rex? English for Academic Purposes, 3, 247–269.

Uzuner, S. (2008). Multilingual scholars’ participation in core/global academic communities: A literature review. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 7, 250-263. 

AILA is looking for researchers interested in organizing Research Networks (ReN) focused on special topic areas of Applied Linguistics. If you would like to work internationally on your area of research together with other scholars from all over theworld, you might consider applying to be a ReN organizer.

  

What is a ReN?

Research Networks (ReNs) seek to promote research and its dissemination in all academic areas of AILA, with a particular focus on areas that have the potential for new cross-disciplinary research.

ReNs exist for three years and can be renewed. At any point in time, there will be about 15 ReNs in existence. Reapplications are required every three years by the criteria listed below:

  • at least five members, some of whom should be new scholars,
  • multinational composition with universities from at least three countries,
  • participants are active in the research area of the ReN pertaining to applied linguistics,
  • a program for research activities for the three years between congresses, including a commitment to present a symposium at the upcoming AILA World Congress and an organizer (one of the members) who liases with the ReN Coordinator.

How to set up a ReN

For applications, the ReN organizer must submit a proposal to the ReN Coordinator. The deadline for submission is two months after the World Congress. The proposal should consist of

  • a statement concerning the scope of the ReN,
  • a list of the participants of the ReN and their affiliation,
  • a plan for ReN activities for the upcoming three years, and
  • a commitment to fill their ReN symposium slot at the AILA Congress three years hence.

Each ReN organizer is responsible for a brief written report to the ReN Coordinator every three years (2 months after the congress).

Applications to set up a ReN should be directed to the AILA ReN Coordinator and the decision on the acceptance of the proposal will be notified to the ReN organizers no later than two months after the proposal submission deadline.


Research Networks Coordinator

Dr. Laura Gurzynski-Weiss

url.jpg

Indianna University, Bloomington, USA

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


 

Members on the ReN committee

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., University of Jyväskylä, Finland

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Beijing Foreign Studies University, Beijing, China

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., University of Siena, Arezzo, Italy